“Faking It” on MTV

mtv-faking-it-interviews

Alright. Here’s my dilemma… I don’t know where to begin with this one. First off, I applaud MTV for once again showcasing the LGBT community on their network. Buuuuuuut, I am not too thrilled about how they showcased them.

The premiere/pilot of “Faking It” was just this past week.  As I was cruising the various stations on my TV tonight, I spot two girls kissing and immediately stop my channel surfing. I had to see the whole episode, so as the good dedicated lesbian that I am I went online and start watching it (you can watch it here – http://www.mtv.com/shows/faking_it/video/full-episodes/).

This show is basically about two BFF’s, Amy (Rita Volk, the blondie) and Karma (Katie Stevens, boy crazed brunette) who pretend to be lesbians to gain social acceptance at their super-tolerant high school (which oddly enough is in Texas, granted Austin is supposed to be super hip – so my bro says). Anyway, if I knew being a lesbian was so cool I would have come out a lot sooner! Jokes aside, in the world we live in today, and how far we’ve come with LGBT equality, it’s as if this show is going backwards. Helloooo, be yourself and you’ll get friends that way. Yes, let’s teach our youth to lie and pretend to be someone they aren’t just to fit in. Good message MTV! Wait, let me remember, it is MTV and majority of this station consists of bullshit.

Ok, calm down Katie, there’s still more to discuss.

I haven’t even gotten to the hunky teenage boy who Karma undresses with her eyes every time she sees him. But wait, you’re supposed to be a lesbian, Karma… ugh, so confusing! Anyhow, it’s clear that Amy hates the entire set-up and doesn’t like “faking it” but does what makes her BFF happy. How sweet is she? I can already sense the “Oh shit, I’m a reeeeal lesbian and I’m going to fall in love with my best friend” situation. Anyone else feel that, too? It’s a given. MTV you can hire me now ;)

Long story short, Amy and Karma decide to keep going with the fake lesbian spiel and run for home-coming queens since now they are oh so “popular”. HA, it’s about to get cray! Cue Lauren, all high on her traditions and old-school ways, overhears the girls and how they’re making everyone believe they’re lesbians to fit in. Home-coming speech time comes around and BAM, Lauren blows those fake masks right off

UNTIL….

Wait for it...
Wait for it…
Mhmm, I was sold here too.
Mhmm, I was sold here too.

Sealed with a kiss. The crowd goes wild.

Amy once again comes to the rescue of her dear BFF Karma and plants one right on her. And there you have it… the fakers successfully steal the show. Hmm, but that Amy… after that kiss… you know she was feeling more than she thought she would. Of course. One of them had to or this show wouldn’t exist.

Parent Support

We already know how tough it is when we are dealing with coming out, but what we don’t realize is that our parent’s and families have a coming out process as well. My mother recently told me she wanted to write about her experience when I was coming out, how hard/easy it was to accept, what the adjustment was like, etc. Luckily my mother accepted me with open arms. Sometimes parent’s and families aren’t very open and can possibly shut you out because they ran into the same closet you just came out of. Right? It sparked my idea to inform parent’s and families that there ARE support groups, websites, and books to help you through it and to give you a better understanding of your children.

http://community.pflag.org/page.aspx?pid=209

PFLAG which stands for Parent’s, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. This website is very informative. It has extensive support, advocacy &  issues, education & programs, an online news room, and also a place for you to take action. This website even has a page dedicated to LGBTQ terminology. This site is one of my favorites and one I hope you take the time to read.

http://www.gayfamilysupport.com/

This website was created by a woman and a mother of 2 gay children. She writes from her own experience, what her children went through, and how she felt during the process. I love that her website has many links to different books you can read. Whether you’re a child getting your parent a book for extra support, or you’re the parent looking for support, there are many options for you to look into. She has a link to personal family stories which lets you know you’re not alone. Other parent’s are right there with you feeling the same way. You can even see what famous people are gay/lesbian! Check it out.

http://www.kidspeace.org/healing.aspx?id=1186

This is an article that I came across and really loved. The woman who wrote it has been a teacher and counselor for over 20 years and a therapist for 25 years. Here is an excerpt from the article:

“Parenting gay children can be challenging, rewarding and ultimately life changing. The level of acceptance of sexual orientation and gender identity by fathers and mothers can detract from or expand a child’s healthy growth and development in countless ways. Too many of our LGBT (lesbian, gay bisexual, and transgender) youth face emotional isolation, rejection, and complete withdrawal from parents that lead many to depression, drugs and alcohol and even homelessness.”

These are just a few of the resources out there. Parent’s, please take the time to check out these websites. And if you’re a child who has a parent(s) or family that needs support, help them out. Go out and get them a book, or maybe print some of the information off of these sites and leave it for them to read. Let’s support each other!